Montpelier Villa Code of Conduct


Introduction

Players Code of Conduct

Code of Conduct for Club Officials, Managers and Coaches

Code of Conduct for Parents, Guardians and Supporters

Anti-Bullying Policy

The role of Child-Welfare Officer




Code of Conduct Introduction



The Child Welfare Officer (CWO) role has changed as the club has developed with a number of recommendations and guidelines being set by the Football Association.

As a result, we have decided to introduce a four-tier code of conduct which covers all aspects of involvement at Montpelier Villa.



We believe that it is essential that the CWO is approachable with a child-centred outlook.

We have attended Safeguarding Children in Football workshops as well as Welfare Officer training workshops and hold a current Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) check.



The CWO covers a number of duties to ensure the safety and protection of club members and as such, we are a member of the club committee.

If you would like to know more about the clubs child protection policies or to discuss any concerns/questions you may have, please do not hesitate to contact us at montpeliervilla@gmail.com.



IF YOU HAVE SERIOUS CONCERNS OVER A CHILD’S SAFETY, YOU CAN CONTACT THE POLICE OR THE NSPCC DIRECT ON 0808 800 5000.



 


Player's Code of Conduct



Players are the most important people in the sport.

 

Playing for the team, and for the team to win, is the most fundamental part of the game. But not winning at any cost – fair play and respect for all others in the game is fundamentally important.



It is expected that all Montpelier Villa players will conduct themselves in a manner that is both honourable and in keeping with the spirit of fair play and sportspersonship.
They will not indulge themselves in tactics, either by word or action, that are likely to bring the game, this club or the league in which it plays into disrepute. In particular, the standards below should be followed at all times:

Obligations towards the game.

A player should;

Promote the highest standard of sportspersonship and see that fair play be paramount at all time.

Ensure that the “spirit of the game” is not abused.

Avoid all forms of gamespersonship and time-wasting.

Never use inappropriate language.

Respect towards opponents.
 
A player should;

Treat opponents with due respect at all times, irrespective of the result of the game.

Seek to shake hands with opponents and Team Officials of the opposition at the end of each game.

Players should treat victory with humility and defeat with dignity.

Respect towards the match officials.
 
A player should;

Accept the decision of the match official without protest.

Avoid words or actions, which may mislead a match official.

Show due respect towards match officials and shake hands with match officials at the end of the game.

Respect towards team officials.
 
A player should;



Abide by the instructions of their manager, coach and team officials, provided they do not contradict the spirit of this code.



Show due respect towards the team officials of the opposition.



 


Code of Conduct for Club Officials, Managers and Coaches



Sportspersonship and ethical values highlighting respect, fairness, civility, honesty, integrity and accountability are a foundation for the development of young players and for the sport as a whole.



Our ethical behaviour is demonstrated in our relationships with players, colleagues, officials, parents and administrators. We are ambassadors for our club and our league. We are also role models and as such we have a big influence upon the young players who comprise our teams.



For this reason each manager and coach should consider his/her primary responsibility the promotion of ethical conduct which advances the spirit of the game and to adhere to established rules.



Football has a role to play in the educational development of young people. Coaches and managers need to be aware of this fact and contribute to the young player’s development in a positive way.

The attitude of the coach is essential in both the short and long term development of the players. All managers and coaches should acquire the right attitude and coaching perspective towards such matters as the rules of the game as well as total player development.




Code of Conduct for Team Officials



Obligations towards the game.


The team official should;

Set a positive example for others, particularly young players and supporters.

Promote and develop his/her own team, having regard to the interest of the players and supporters.



Avoid all forms of gamespersonship.



Show due respect to match officials and others involved in the game.



Not use or tolerate inappropriate language.



Obligations towards the team.
 
The team official should;

Make every effort to develop the sporting, technical and tactical levels of the club/team.



Strive to obtain the best results for the team, whilst disassociating from a “win-at-all-costs” attitude.



Give priority to the interests of the team over individual interests.



Resist all illegal or unsporting influences.



Show due respect for the interests of the players, coaches and officials.



Obligations towards the supporters.
 
The team official should;



Show due respect for the interests of supporters.



Respect towards the match officials.
 
A team official should;



Accept the decisions of the match official without protest.



Avoid words or actions, which may mislead a match official.



Show due respect towards match officials.



Recognise the authority and position that the match officials hold, which should not be challenged or questioned in public.



The team manager, only, shall address all reasonable queries or clarifications, to the referee in person, at full time.

 




Code of Conduct for Coaching



Montpelier Villa FC is proud to adopt The F.A. Coaches Association Code of Conduct set out below and this forms the benchmark for all involved in managing/coaching within the club:



Coaches must respect the rights, dignity and worth of each and every person and treat each equally within the context of the sport.



Coaches must place the well-being and safety of each player above all other considerations, including the development of performance.



Coaches must adhere to all guidelines laid down by governing bodies.



Coaches must develop an appropriate working relationship with each player based on mutual trust and respect.



Coaches must not exert undue influence to obtain personal benefit or reward.



Coaches must encourage and guide players to accept responsibility for their own behaviour and performance.



Coaches must ensure that the activities they direct or advocate are appropriate for the age, maturity, experience and ability of players.



Coaches should, at the outset, clarify with the players (and, where appropriate, parents) exactly what is expected of them and also what they are entitled to expect from their coach.



Coaches must co-operate fully with other specialists (e.g. other managers, coaches, officials, sports scientists, doctors, physiotherapists) in the best interests of the player.



Coaches must always promote the positive aspects of the sport (e.g. fair play) and never condone violations of the Laws of the Game, behaviour contrary to the spirit of the Laws of the Game or relevant rules and regulations or the use of prohibited substances or techniques.



Coaches must consistently display high standards of behaviour and appearance.



Coaches must not use or tolerate inappropriate language.




Breaches of this Code



Persons who breach this Code of Conduct shall be subject to disciplinary action taken in accordance with the Club’s Disciplinary Code.
 
Examples of the most common types of unacceptable behaviour are:

Abusive behaviour or language

Threatening behaviour

Violent conduct

Racist, sexist or homophobic language

Provocative, rude or obscene language and gestures


Code of Conduct for Parents, Guardians & Spectators

Parents and spectators have a great influence on children’s enjoyment and success in football.
 
All children play football because they first and foremost love the game.
 
It is important to remember that however good a child becomes at football, it is important to reinforce the message to parents and spectators that positive encouragement will contribute to a player’s enjoyment, sense of personal achievement, self-esteem, and development.



Adult behaviour must be of the highest standard to set the correct example to the players.



Parents’ and spectators’ expectations and attitudes also have a significant bearing on a player’s attitude towards:



Other players


Officials


Managers


Spectators



It is expected that all parents and spectators will conduct themselves in a manner that is both honourable and in keeping with the spirit of fair play and sportspersonship.
 

They will not indulge themselves in tactics, either by word or action, that are likely to bring the game, this club or the league in which it plays into disrepute.



In particular, parents and spectators of the club should always:



Be positive and encouraging towards all of the children, not just their own.

Applaud the opposition as well as their own team.

Avoid coaching the child during the game.

Avoid shouting at players, match officials or team officials and the use of provocative, rude or obscene language or gestures.

Respect the decisions of managers and coaches at all times.

Respect the decisions of match officials at all times. In many cases newly qualified referees, often young in years, are appointed to youth matches in order to gain experience and these officials should be given encouragement and support.

Give attention to each of the children involved, not just the most talented.

Give encouragement to everyone to participate in football.

Treat victory with humility and be generous in their praise for the opposition.

Treat defeat with dignity and give support to the players.




Breaches of this code



Persons who breach this Code of Conduct may be subject to disciplinary action taken in accordance with the Club’s Disciplinary Code. Examples of the most common types of unacceptable behaviour are:



Abusive behaviour or language

Threatening behaviour

Violent conduct

Racist, sexist or homophobic language



Provocative, rude or obscene language and gestures



Matters of team selection, including the playing of substitutes, remain the sole responsibility of the team manager and his/her decision will remain final. The position and authority of the team manager shall be recognised and his/her decisions shall not be challenged or questioned in public.

 

Any reasonable queries, or points of team selection and the like that require clarification may be addressed to the team manager in private either after a match or on any day before a match day.

 

A team manager is under no obligation to respond to parents’ or guardians’ comments or queries just before or during a game.



Any complaint regarding the opposition, referee, spectators or any other aspect of the game must be dealt with by the team manager. It is not acceptable for individuals to take the law into their own hands.


 


Anti-Bullying Policy



Unacceptable Behaviour

 
The following are examples of unacceptable behaviour:

Bullying in any form

Physical violence

Bad language and swearing

Name calling including racism, sexism and homophobia

Intimidation

Defiance and lying

Destruction of property

Deliberate unkindness


Bullying usually arises:

When it is carried out deliberately

When it is repeated over a period of time

When children become vulnerable and unable to defend themselves


Bullying can take many forms:

Physical

Verbal

Indirect



Dealing with Bullying


 

Bullying in any form is not acceptable at Montpelier Villa FC. Every effort is made to deal with both victim and bully in a sensitive way acknowledging the need for confidentiality, sensitivity and a sympathetic, fair and firm approach.

 

No child should live in fear of another.

Coaches and helpers have a critical role to play in watching out for, and dealing with bullies and incidents of bullying.
Parents should be kept informed of any action and strategy used to combat any form of bullying.


 
Sanctions



Sanctions may be applied if there are instances of unacceptable behaviour. Usually it is sufficient for a coach or helper to show disapproval of an individual child’s inappropriate behaviour. Withdrawal from the training session or match is the most commonly used sanction.



If the problem persists then some of the following steps may be taken:



The coach or helper talks with the child if necessary withdraws them from match or training session
The coach discusses concerns with the committee before taking further action

Coaches may have an informal discussion with parents about behaviour causing concern

If unacceptable behaviour persists, the coach or committee will inform parents and request a meeting to discuss the problem

As a result of the meeting, further strategies to combat problem behaviour will be devised and monitored
Fixed term or permanent exclusions are a final sanction for the severest behavioural problems in accordance with the club rules




The Role of Child Welfare Officer



Why is it so important to have a Welfare Officer?


All sports have a responsibility to ensure they provide a safe and fun environment for children and young people.



Through the Every Child Matters: Change for Children programme, the government makes it very clear that sport has to put safeguards in place. Football, along with other sports such as cricket, rugby and swimming – to name but a few – believe the best way to do this is to appoint a Welfare Officer.
 
For more information on what is expected of sport in terms of safeguarding children, go to www.thecpsu.org.uk or to www.everychildmatters.co.uk

Football accepts it has a clear responsibility towards young people.
 
Making sure everyone knows how to report concerns about a child’s welfare is essential. Knowing how to deal with poor practice issues is also vital.



A Welfare Officer has three key roles. 

They should be informed and aware of the league or club’s responsibilities when running football activities for children and young people. For example: ensuring these responsibilities are well understood by others and developing best practice processes.
 
They should also help league and club personnel understand their ‘duty of care’ towards children and young people. For example: ensuring all relevant people complete The FA’s ‘Safeguarding Children’ training programme. A Welfare Officer will also manage the roll out of FA CRB checks.

Caroline Batchelor

Child Welfare Officer
caroline_batchelor@hotmail.com

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